This revolution is ours, as well. It might not have been a revolution for women’s rights, but now that we started the political revolution, if we don’t have a social sexual revolution that works on the ground, that political revolution will fail. It’s not about replacing one misogynistic patriarch with another.Well, it’s a fantastic documentary that paired women writers with girls from their countries.  So I was paired with a wonderful 13-year-old girl in Egypt who was a survivor of rape. And I myself was sexually assaulted close to Tahrir Square in November of 2011. So when the two of us met, we had a lot to share.  But, you know, there I was at the time, you know, 44 years-old, 43 years-old.  And she was 13. And the spirit of this girl, who had never had any kind of formal education, the way that she fought back, the way she and her mother went to the police to demand justice for the rape that she survived and her enthusiasm for education and her mother’s agreement to, you know, to have her daughter be paired with me and have her story told was just wonderful. And, you know, I urge everyone to watch the film, because it really goes to the heart of this, that when girls are educated, everybody benefits. So I’m glad CNN is showing it and I was glad to be a part of it.

Here at GPS we’ve read through over 3,000 viewer blog comments, viewer e-mails, Facebook messages and Tweets to suss out what changes, if any, you would like to see to the U.S. Constitution. Here’s what we found:About a third of you were appalled by the idea of changing the U.S. constitution at all. You certainly didn’t think the U.S. should follow Iceland’s example.I understand your hypothesis, but I do not believe looking at Iceland’s example is prudent. Seeking a fresh economic start does not require a constitutional convention, nor does it justify one. Trashing core documents is a tempting path during a crisis period. The false illusion of going back to zero and restarting assumes that the bad habits that got you to the crisis point won’t be waiting for you later on.Hey, I have a better idea. Instead of trying to change the constitution lets try to follow it! The constitution is the supreme law of the land… How about applying the constitution to any law being passed? That way you’ll know when government is overreaching. Don’t change the constitution – ENFORCE IT.

Hate to break it to you…but the constitution has been changed before… 27 times to be exact (although the first 10 are what you would call The Bill of Rights). it took a change to the constitution to eliminate slavery and give those former slaves the same god-given right to vote that white men had. it took a change to the constitution to give women the right to vote. the constitution is a living document that the founders designed with the idea that we can change it to adapt to the world. they could not forsee everything that was going to happen in the world, so they gave us article 5 which lays out the amendment process. sorry to rain on your ”never change the document” parade with reality.